World Library  


 
  • Cover Image

Henry Ford

Fordlandia
After building the Quadricycle,the first gasoline-powered horseless carriage, American business tycoon and industrialist Henry Ford achieved many more accomplishments. In 1903, he founded the Ford Motor Company. One month later, the first Ford car Model A was assembled at a plant in Detroit.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Film

Early Accolades
Hollywood has a long, glittering history of lauding its own. From Academy Awards to Oscars to independent films, the industry ensures every actor, director, producer, screenwriter, and other professional involved in the production of silver screen entertainment has a chance to receive recognition and express gratitude for the opportunity to strut their stuff.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Almost Men

Widows
Historically, women had few legal rights. Cultures the world over considered women merely extensions of the men to whom they were bound and subject to the protection or exploitation of those men without much in the way of legal recourse. In short, women had no separate legal existence from their male guardians whether those guardians be their fathers, husbands, adult brothers, or adult sons. Unless they were widowed.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Donut Day

Bear Claws, Crullers, and Holes
National Donut Day, established in 1938, occurs the first Friday of June and honors the Salvation Army’s “Doughnut Girls” and the Red Cross’ “Doughnut Dollies” who served donuts to soldiers in the trenches during World Wars I and II, respectively. Although primarily a U.S. holiday, donut shops around the world have been known to hoist a cinnamon roll in celebration.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Beyond Speech

Talking Animals in Children’s Literature
Anthropomorphism, a fancy term concerning the personification of animals by attributing human characteristics to them, occupies a treasured spot in children’s fiction. The addition of speech to creatures that do not normally engage in conversation such as we humans think of it serves as a mode through which authors teach moral lessons, if only because the animals can talk back. 

Read More
  • Cover Image

Heroic Heroines

First, let’s consider the heroic tradition which arises from, well, tradition. Let’s be honest, tradition values strength and valor as masculine traits. Look at practically any fairy tale: Cinderella, Snow White, Rapunzel, Sleeping Beauty. They each display traits of traditional feminine ideals: diligence, kindness, generosity, physical beauty, fidelity, and not a courageous or aggressive bone among them.  

First, let’s consider the heroic tradition which arises from, well, tradition. Let’s be honest, tradition values strength and valor as masculine traits. Look at practically any fairy tale: Cinderella, Snow White, Rapunzel, Sleeping Beauty. They each display traits of traditional feminine ideals: diligence, kindness, generosity, physical beauty, fidelity, and not a courageous or aggressive bone among them.  

Female protagonists have waited a long time to break out from those socially imposed confines, but some authors realized the amazing potential of females in the heroic tradition and to pave the way for many of today’s kickass, weapons-toting heroines.
Read More
  • Cover Image

Sweets for the Sweet

[A]nd as for the sweets, I won’t tell you how cheap and good they were, because it would only make your mouth water in vain.

From The Magician’s Nephew by C. S. Lewis
Read More
  • Cover Image

May Faith Traditions

Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Few months are so active in faith traditions as May, the spring season’s revitalization of nature similarly inspires a resurgence in religious fervor. The world’s three major faith traditions—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—each celebrate significant religious holidays during May.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Keeping the Peace

Law Enforcement
The duty of every government concerns the enforcement of  law, protection of property rights, and preservation of class systems to maintain civil order; however, the concept of a uniformed and professional police force dates back only to the 19th century. Historically, families, clans, and the military assumed and carried out the responsibility for law enforcement, which led to exploitation and abuses, often with vengeance in mind rather than justice.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Golf

A Tradition of Excellence
Golf is a tradition of excellence. The 15th century Scottish game is one of the world’s most beloved pastimes. The quaint rolling greens and the majestic scenery that comprise most golf courses arise from  meticulous designs by renowned architects, landscapers, and former players to challenge recreational golfers and world champions alike. Whistling Straits in Mosel, Wisconsin, the Old Course at St Andrews in St. Andrews, Scotland, and the Royal Melbourne Golf Course in Australia point to the dedication and ingenuity imperative in crafting the world’s most celebrated courses.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Pop Music

Setting the Tone Over and Again
Try to distinguish popular music from almost every other genre. We bet you can’t. Bruno Mars’ song “Uptown Funk” fuses elements of rhythm and blues (R&B), funk, and rock and roll to create a timeless sound. Michael Jackson drew from R&B and dance music to become the “king of pop.” It is no coincidence that performers and fans find familiar melodies in their favorite songs.

Read More
  • Cover Image

May Day

Traditions
It’s finally spring, a time for rebirth, renewal, and new beginnings. May 1st marks May Day, a traditional springtime festival celebrated by various cultures around the globe. This holiday is still widely celebrated today, but its origins lie in ancient pagan celebrations that involved fertility rites. 

Read More
  • Cover Image

Women Artists

Making an Impression
Throughout history, various groups of women have banded together to battle for a more egalitarian world. More recently, women and men have joined Women’s Marches and the Me Too movement and championed for narrowing the pay gap.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Fashion Silhouettes

The Shape of Things to Come
Most people don’t associate fashion with the military, but several clothing silhouettes have roots in military history. The raglan sleeve is named after Lord Raglan, the first Baron Raglan, who lost his arm in battle. The sleeve extends in one piece to the collar, leaving a diagonal seam from underarm to collarbone. Lord Raglan’s tailor created it to facilitate easier dressing and allow ample room for the baron to use his sword. In recent years, modern fashion houses Chanel and Miu Miu have shown variations of this sleeve. For more on Lord Raglan’s legacy, read The War: From the Death of Lord Raglan to the Evacuation of Crimea and The Invasion of the Crimea: Its Origin, And an Account of Its Progress Down to the Death of Lord Raglan

Read More
  • Cover Image

Cultures Column

Color Theories
We use color to express personality. We carefully select the colors we wear, the hues that adorn our homes, and the colors of the cars we drive. Color trends continually change, fueling demand in fashion, home décor, cosmetics, and the auto industry. In fact, every year color authority Pantone introduces its Color of the Year. Ultra Violet was selected for 2018. 

Read More
  • Cover Image

Was Lao Tzu an Anti-Intellectual?

Looking into the Tao Te Ching
The Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu said, "Abandon learning, and you will be free from trouble and distress." (The Saying of Lao Tzu, p. 45) Another version has the same lines translated as "When we renounce learning we have no troubles...The ancients who showed their skill in practicing the Tao did so not to enlighten people, but to make them simple and ignorant." (The Story of Civilization, p. 653)

Read More
  • Cover Image

A Journalist Tries on Madness

Nellie Bly
By the time writer and reporter Nellie Bly—born on May 5, 1864—was age 23, she was bored with the regular theater and arts she reported on up until that point. She wanted to push into new territory. So in 1887, only two years into journalism, Bly dove into immersion journalism—a precursor to gonzo journalism—pretending to be insane in order to get admitted to the Women's Lunatic Asylum on Blackwell's Island (today known as New York City’s Roosevelt Island).

Read More
  • Cover Image

Humanism, Poetry and Modernism

Archibald Macleish
Poetry stands apart from the concrete. Like the poeticisms of the Tao Te Ching, it speaks in paradoxes in order to circle an idea that cannot be expressed outright. In “Theory of Poetry” (New and Collected Poems, p. 418), American poet Archibald Macleish writes, "Know the world by heart / Or never know it! / Let the pedant stand apart— / Nothing he can name will show it: / Also him of intellectual art. / None know it / Till they know the world by heart.”

Read More
  • Cover Image

World Press Day

Price of Freedom
As the saying goes, “Freedom isn’t free.” It should be every free person’s daily mantra. Those born with it take it for granted. But the cost for freedom is steep, as both historical accounts and contemporary freedom fighters tell us. 

Read More
  • Cover Image

Negative Capablity

John Keats
Poet John Keats coined the enduring theory “negative capability” in a short shrug of a letter to his brothers: 

… it struck me what quality went to form a Man of Achievement, especially in Literature, and which Shakespeare possessed so enormously I mean Negative Capability, that is, when a man is capable of being in uncertainties, mysteries, doubts, without any irritable reaching after fact and reason. Coleridge, for instance, would let go by a fine isolated verisimilitude caught from the Penetralium of mystery, from being incapable of remaining content with half-knowledge. This pursued through volumes would perhaps take us no further than this, that with a great poet the sense of Beauty overcomes every other consideration, or rather obliterates all consideration. (The Complete Poetical Works and Letters of John Keats, p. 277)
Read More
 
1
|
2
|
3
|
4
|
5
Records: 41 - 60 of 288 - Pages: 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Nook eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.